Inspiration

Irish artist Elizabeth Jorn’s sensual and contemporary sculptures are invitations to touch, feel and hold. The inspirations for her work are diverse; the reinterpretations of ancient myths, human emotions, a phrase from a book or film and the beauty of nature are all developed into original artwork.


"I think most art is created from an almost desperate bid to savour life and to express either it’s great beauty or immense ugliness. I chose to express what I consider beauty although a hair’s breadth away lurks a darker side. The duality in most things, the continuity of life and it’s interconnectedness fascinates me and I enjoy trying to express it. The timelessness of old stories and beliefs add colour to life and can still speak to us today linking us to our ancestors and each other in our curiosity and attempts to understand the world"


  • Makareepon Fruit
    Makareepon Fruit

    Located somewhere in the remote folds of the Himalaya Mountains is the legendary Himmapan Forest.

    In the gods own forest grows a magical tree which bears a unique fruit of mythical female beings, the Makareepon.

    Inspired by the image of a female fruit bearing tree the sculptor Elizabeth Jorn created her interpretation of the Makareepon four ladies relaxing and companionably conversing in the peaceful depths of a forest glade.

    The hand cuppable curves and shapes of the fruit should invite the viewer to pick up the sculptures and enjoy the tactile feel of the pieces as well as the beauty of the visual interconnected flow of the lines and forms of the sculpture.

    Height:15cm
    View this sculpture in the online gallery.
  • Pandora
    Pandora : Hope left

    As with most ancient stories there are slightly different versions of the Pandora tale but the most salient facts that appealed to Elizabeth Jorn are summed up in this following version.

    In Greek mythology Pandora (which means “all gifted”) was the first women on Earth.

    She was sent to earth, by the Greek chief god Zeus, with a box that she was instructed not to open. Eventually Pandora’s curiosity overcame her caution and she opened the box thus releasing all the negative, evil things of the world that had been sealed in the box. When Pandora realized what she had done she tried to slam the lid shut but everything had escaped only hope was left…… 

    “Whatever evils are abroad hope never entirely leaves us and while we have that no amount of other ills can make us completely wretched.”

    Hope is often represented as a butterfly and in our sculpture inside the corner of the box that Pandora is holding is a simple stylized butterfly etched into the bottom of the box.

     Like a butterfly hope is a fragile, precious thing so we also like the fact that the words ‘hope left’ in the sculptures title have a double meaning, one positive and one negative, to remind us of the value of hope.

    Height: 37cm
    View this sculpture in the online gallery.
  • Icarus
    Icarus

    In Greek mythology Icarus exhilarated by the thrill of flying did not heed his father’s warning and flew too close to the sun. His wax based wings began to melt and he plummeted into the sea.

    Inspired by the flame or lotus shaped Thai kranok motif Elizabeth Jorn’s Icarus is a reminder of the beauty that can be found in the transitory nature of life and the need for a mindful use of the wonders of technologies.

    Height: 100cm
    View this sculpture in the online gallery.
  • Lakshmi
    Lakshmi

    Lakshmi, the Hindu goddess of wealth and happiness, the consort of Vishnu.

     “She was born in the full flush of beauty adorned with a diadem when the gods churned the ocean of milk to obtain the beverage of immortality”

    The fantastical images conjured up by these colourful words inspired Elizabeth Jorn to create her golden Lakshmi.

    Height: 39cm
    View this sculpture in the online gallery.
  • Gaia
    Gaia

    Gaia: Mother Earth protecting the Tree of Life.

    Elizabeth Jorn likes people to be drawn to reach out and touch her work : touch is one of the most intimate and universal senses we have so they portray Gaia or Mother Earth in rich curves to invite the viewer to caress her, to be  connected and to feel connected to her and the momentous task she , and we all have to protect this miraculous planet we miraculously live on. Her generously rotund shape is also made to echo the shape of the planet and the spiraling stand represents the multilayered spinning universe in which we sail !

    Height: 42cm
    View this sculpture in the online gallery.
  • Mae Toranee
    Mae Toranee

    Mae Toranee is the Thai Mother Earth and in Elizabeth Jorn’s sculpture she is depicted wringing the water out of the hair to nurture the planet with one of life’s most precious commodities.

    In a popular Buddhist story Mae Toranee aided Buddha by washing away demons that were trying to tempt him while he was meditating and just before he reached enlightenment.

    Height: 43cm
    View this sculpture in the online gallery.
  • Brown Horse
    Gold Horse

    Throughout history horse and man have had an interlinked relationship in life and art.

    Elizabeth Jorn had for some time been mentally working on a horse head sculpture, she wanted to be able to capture the sturdy, steadfastness and beautiful lines of the equine head but also to  convey a primitiveness.

    On waking one morning folds in a curtain and shadows made by the low rising sun formed a shape that she knew was her horse sculpture. A quick sketch made of the folds and shadows became the basis of her Gold Horse.

    Height : 52cm
    View this sculpture in the online gallery.
  • Green Horse
    Green Horse

    Throughout history horse and man have had an interlinked relationship in life and art.

    Elizabeth Jorn had for some time been mentally working on a horse head sculpture, she wanted to be able to capture the sturdy, steadfastness and beautiful lines of the equine head but also to  convey a primitiveness.

    On waking one morning folds in a curtain and shadows made by the low rising sun formed a shape that she knew was her horse sculpture. A quick sketch made of the folds and shadows became the basis of her Horse.

  • Now
    Now

    Being mindful of the present on the journey of life.

    Height: 16cm
    View this sculpture in the online gallery.
  • Manohra
    Manohra

    Manohra in Thai mythology was the most beautiful of the Kinnarees, half-bird half-women beings that inhabit the mythical Himmapan forest.

    Height: 16cm
    Bronze with chestnut patina
    View this sculpture in the online gallery.
  • Venus (gold, silver)
    Venus

    Venus, the goddess of love.  Joyously corpulent female figurines sometimes called Venus figures, that date back through history thousands of years, were the inspiration to the Irish artist Elizabeth Jorn for this generously curvaceous Venus

    Bronze with gold leaf.
    View this sculpture in the online gallery.
  • Rama
    Rama

    Rama, the avatar of the Hindu god Vishnu and the hero of the classical tale the Ramayana.

    Height: 60cm
    Bronze with gold leaf.
    View this sculpture in the online gallery.
  • Kinnaree
    Kinaree

    In Thai mythology Kinaree are beautiful half bird,  half women beings that inhabit the mythical Himmapan forest.

    Height:  39cm
    Bronze with gold leaf.
    View this sculpture in the online gallery.
  • Akbar (gold)
    Akbar

    Akbar the celebrated Mogul emperor  wears the mask of time.

    Height: 46cm
    Bronze with gold leaf.
    View this sculpture in the online gallery.
  • Escape
    Escape

    Escape: sleep, dreams, tranquility.

    Height: 46cm
    Bronze with gold leaf.
    View this sculpture in the online gallery.
  • Apsara
    Apsara

    Apsaras, celestial maidens who danced sang and entertained the gods. Sensual and seductive Apsaras were an expression of idealized female beauty.

    Height:  36 cm
    Bronze with gold leaf.
    View this sculpture in the online gallery.